Dawn Before the Darkness: What the Upcoming Solar Eclipse Means for Food Service Operators

On the morning of August 21st the sun over California will dim by about 70% as America experiences its first coast-to-coast solar eclipse since 1979. Back in the 70’s, solar was a futuristic technology, but now we are living in that future and on some days, California meets as much as 40% of its electric demand with solar power1. No one knows exactly what effect the loss of solar radiation will have on the State’s electric grid but best guesses put the loss of peak generation at about 6000 Megawatts or enough electricity to power up 6 million homes2.

Don’t worry, the folks who operate California’s electric grid have been planning for this event and will ramp up natural gas and hydroelectric generators to make up for the lost solar power. They do not anticipate any power outages or brown-outs but, they will have to keep a sharp eye on the continuously changing solar supply and adjust the power mix carefully as the moon’s shadow passes over the State2.

The eclipse will be a big event for astronomers and science nerds like me (I have already ordered my Bill Nye Eclipse Glasses3) but, the spike in carbon output, as those natural gas-fired power plants are turned on, is kind of a bittersweet side effect. I plan to help ease the load on the grid that morning by turning off any unnecessary lights and deferring other electric use – like clothes washing and drying and dishwashing until later that evening.

As a commercial food service operator, you can do your part to make up for the missing solar by taking a few simple actions. As a bonus, you will also save money even when the solar comes back online and you will still be cutting carbon. Here are a few easy ways to save electricity:

  1. Install efficient lighting: If you haven’t already upgraded to LED lighting, now is the time. You can definitely screw in some LED replacement lamps between now and August 21st. For some really big bang-for-the-buck, replace those 60 watt incandescent Edison lamps with 4 watt LED Edison lamps – that’s a 15-fold reduction in electric power use. Also be sure to turn off any unneeded lights (empty dining rooms, storerooms, offices) or signage.

  2. Clean your refrigeration coils: Really dirty coils can double the electricity use of your coolers and freezers. It’s easy to clean the coils and it will also make your equipment last longer. This is particularly important since refrigeration energy use is directly related to outdoor temperature. If August 21st turns out to be a hot day, then clean coils will take even more load off the electric grid.

  3. Make sure the temperature in your refrigerators and freezers is set properly – don’t overcool – and during the eclipse, try not to load your boxes or run your defrost cycle. Keeping compressor use at a minimum that morning will take a big load of the system.

  4. Don’t turn your exhaust hoods on until you need them: Wait until you fire up your appliances before turning on your exhaust hoods. Running the hoods when they are not required is a waste of fan power.

  5. Service your air conditioning units: Poor maintenance is a major cause of rooftop AC unit failure and a drag on the electric grid. Get a preventive maintenance plan in place before the <21st and tune up your AC units. Then on the morning of the 21st, try to raise the AC setpoint a degree or two if possible – just until a little before noon. The sun will be close to full brightness by noon and you can lower the temperature for lunch service if you need to.

  6. Be very efficient with your Dishmachine operations: Load your racks as fully as possible so you run fewer racks through the machine. This is especially important for high temperature dishmachines that have both electric tank heaters and electric booster heaters.

There may be an effort by organizations opposed to renewable energy to use this eclipse as an example of why renewable energy is not a good idea. But, the bottom line is that the eclipse will not take down the electric system and it will not disrupt commercial food service operations. Still, if you believe that renewable energy is an important part of California’s energy future, and you are interested in limiting carbon emissions, saving money and sending a positive message, then please join me on Monday morning, August 21st as we walk lightly on our electric system and also step outside to witness a truly amazing astronomical phenomenon. You’ll be able to spot me – I’ll be the one with the nerdy Eclipse Glasses on!

Sources:
1 A Solar Eclipse Could Wipe Out 9,000 Megawatts of Power Supplies by Naureen S Malik, July 13th 2017, Bloomberg Technology: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-07-14/a-solar-eclipse-could-wipe-out-9-000-megawatts-of-power-supplies

2 Solar power will take a hit during the Aug. 21 eclipse, June 9th 1017, Washington Post Health and Science: https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/solar-power-will-take-a-hit-during-the-aug-21-eclipse/2017/06/09/0f43c9aa-4c7c-11e7-9669-250d0b15f83b_story.html?utm_term=.f6207dadd498

3 The Planetary Society: https://www.chopshopstore.com/collections/planetarysociety/products/bill-nye-eclipse-glasses?variant=44084054030

What’s On Tap?

Kiana Caban, Communications Assistant

KianaThe FSTC attended the 2016 California Craft Beer Summit, a three-day event with an interactive expo, multiple educational sessions, and a concluding beer festival in Sacramento, CA this past September. The annual event is hosted by the California Craft Brewers Association (CCBA), an entity dedicated to connecting and empowering California craft brewers through advocacy, education, and communication. The Summit brings together craft brewers, visionaries, innovators, business partners, distributors, retailers, and beer lovers across the state to showcase and highlight the craft brewing industry’s growth and success.

Beer brewing is a water and energy intensive process. It takes about 20 gallons of water to produce one pint of beer. Most of that water is used in growing barley and hops, however, a significant amount is used in the brewing process itself. In addition, an essential part of brewing is heating and cooling liquids as rapidly as possible, which requires a lot of energy. Most breweries also operate taprooms and restaurants, which have their own energy and water demands (and where the FSTC could really assert its years of foodservice expertise!) Armed with these notions, the FSTC sought to learn more about the craft beer industry’s practices, while also educating the industry on water- and energy-efficiency at this year’s Summit.

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FSTC team members (from left to right) Janel, Kiana, Michael, and Andre prepare the FSTC booth at the California Craft Beer Summit expo on September 8th, 2016.

Co-hosting the Water Innovations Showcase booth with the nonprofit group American Rivers, the FSTC created various displays showing how brewers and facility operators could save water (and energy) in their breweries.

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The FSTC’s hands-on wort-chilling demonstration presented at the California Craft Beer Summit on September 9th, 2016.

Making It Cold: Savings are Brewing. This hands-on brewing demo featured a copper coil immersion chiller, a (simulated) bucket of wort (aka not-yet-fermented beer), and three buckets of cooling water. The goal was to visually demonstrate the substantial volume of water required to quickly cool down hot wort before fermentation in the brewing process. Seeking a better grasp on the attending breweries’ operations, we asked, “How much water does it take to cool your wort?” Attendees had widely different answers depending on the size of their chillers. We followed with, “What do you do with your leftover cooling water?”

We found that most larger breweries already have sustainable mechanisms in place for water conservation that include reusing cooling water for cleaning brewing equipment, bottling lines, kegs, etc., or even using a glycol cooling system in place of water altogether. However, we learned that some smaller breweries and homebrewers still dump their used cooling water down the drain. With an ongoing statewide drought and the ever increasing price of water, we encouraged these brewers to find reuses for all that wastewater.

What’s Brewing in Your Business? The FSTC also displayed a “Think Tank Questionnaire” where we surveyed some of the attendees about the specifics of their brewery, their foodservice operation (if applicable), their heating/cooling system, etc. This provided a better understanding of California brewery demographics and how the FSTC can assist the brewing industry in its efficiency and sustainability efforts in the future.

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FSTC members attend one of many “Tap Talk” sessions in which brewmasters discussed topics ranging from the rise of barrel-aged and sour beers to business growth and opportunities at the California Craft Beer Summit on September 9th, 2016.

Alongside the interactive sections of the booth, we also had four stations equipped with different energy and water saving tips that most any brewer or brewery could utilize.

Refrigeration Savings are Brewing. Many breweries use custom walk-in coolers for fermentation and keg storage. As such, we recreated the FSTC’s “4-on-the-door” mnemonic to help brewers limit energy waste in walk-ins. “4-on-the-door” is 1) Install an auto door closer, 2) Check door hinge alignment, 3) Inspect and maintain door gaskets regularly, and 4) Add strip curtains as a secondary barrier to heat infiltration.

Water Savings are Brewing. For the brewery restaurant or taproom operator, the easiest and most inexpensive measure you can take to conserve water is to switch to a low-flow pre-rinse spray nozzle. By changing out that old high-flow nozzle to a 1.15 gpm or less nozzle, you can save approximately $1,800/year! Check out California rebate-qualified PRSVs here.

Dish Machine Savings are Brewing. By purchasing an ENERGY STAR® dishwashing machine, breweries can cut costs in half! A standard dishmachine costs $1,200/year to operate, whereas an ENERGY STAR® dishmachine costs $600/year to operate. For more tips on dishmachines, please visit fishnick.com

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The FSTC’s Richard Young demonstrates the energy savings of switching from an incandescent Edison bulb to a LED Edison-style bulb at the California Craft Beer Summit on September 9th, 2016.

Energy Savings are Brewing. Efficient lighting can save you big money. With the power required to light one Edison bulb, you could light fifteen similar LED bulbs! A 60 watt Edison bulb’s annual cost to operate is $45/year, while a 4 watt LED Edison bulb’s annual cost to operate $3/year. What large savings for something so simple to change!

The craft brewing industry was built on innovation, collaboration, and a shared sense of environmental responsibility. With that in mind, the FSTC was heartened to learn that the industry has taken great strides in sustainability and energy efficiency with many of the largest craft brewers leading the way. At the same time, much more can be done to engender energy and water saving best practices industry-wide, not only in the back brewhouse, but in the restaurant and taproom too. The Craft Beer Summit gave the FSTC valuable insight into the scale and particulars of this exciting industry, while also working to expand the FSTC’s energy- and water-saving influence.

The FSTC Raises the Bar…

Claudia Pingatore, Energy Analyst

Claudia-HeadShot03Crop

The Food Service Technology Center is thrilled to broaden its influence to the world of breweries and bars, both energy- and water-intensive industries. To kick off this budding relationship, the FSTC hosted Raising the Bar on October 11th, an evening event with presentations, conversations, and hands-on equipment demonstrations. For those that missed it, topics included chilling/distribution systems, ice, lighting, bar food menus, and the “farm-to-glass” movement.

Hunter Abraham with Chill-Rite presented on serving efficiency for draught beer and wine. He discussed how operators can cater their beverage temperatures to the particular type you are serving and the experience you want to impart. Hunter mentioned that most bar operations end up wasting 30% of their kegged beer through improper dispensing. This adds up to significant wasted potential sales for the bar operator. Installation of an efficient chilling and distribution system can drastically reduce this beer (and energy!) waste and improve temperature control of dispensed beverages.

Pete Palm WPD

Pete Palm of WPD discusses the three rules of ice making for the FSTC’s Raising the Bar event on October 11th, 2016.

Pete Palm with Western Pacific Distributors (WPD) presented on ice making and its inextricable connection to the bar industry. He began with three rules to remember for ice: 1) Ice is a food product, 2) Ice is not 100% water and, 3) Ice types are not equal. He went on to discuss how the right ice types can influence drink presentation and sales. For example, large “gourmet” ice cubes are ideal for craft cocktails since they have a perfect dilution rate (read: slow), their temperature maintenance does not obscure any of the cocktail’s flavors, and they are aesthetically pleasing to the customer, all of which can help justify a cost premium. Pete also talked about ice machines themselves being an excellent opportunity for energy and cost savings in bar service. Specify an ENERGY STAR®/rebate-qualified ice machine when possible. Please visit the FSTC’s ice machine page for more information. For a full list of rebated models visit: fishnick.com/saveenergy/rebates

ryounglighting

The FSTC’s Richard Young demonstrates the 4 Watt LED bulb vs. the 60 Watt Edison bulb for guests on October 11th, 2016.

The FSTC’s own Richard Young then launched into a presentation on the importance of lighting to the bar manager. Studies have shown that lighting has a direct impact on patron’s moods and thus their willingness to spend, so bar lighting should be designed as welcoming as possible. Be intent with you lighting choices: choose lighting that highlights your food/drink options and menus. Drape your bar in soft, indirect lighting that draws people in and encourages them to stay. Also, stay away from the en vogue, but energy-guzzling Edison-style decorative bulbs! Instead, opt for the LED versions of these stylish bulbs that use a fraction of the energy. Check out PG&E’s lighting rebate catalog here.

merrychef

Tim Nasty of Preferred Marketing Group (PMG) cooks quesadillas in the Merrychef rapid cook oven for Raising the Bar guests on October 11th, 2016.

When food is served at a bar, whether it’s small snacks or a full bar menu, the average customer stays a half hour longer! In addition, offering suggested food pairings with drinks is a great way to sell more of each. To help bars get in on this action, Wendy Akers with Boar’s Head described their comprehensive Bistro Program that not only supplies food to operators, but also offers menu consultation, pairing advice, and supporting products such as merchandisers, meal photographs for menus, etc. For more information, contact Wendy at Wendy.Akers@boarshead.com. Jeff Yates with Inform Marketing Group followed with another key component to successful bar food service: appliance ease-of-use and space efficiency. Combination ovens offer both with intelligent controls that make virtually every step of foodservice easier. With its impressive cooking versatility, Jeff claimed that a combi oven could very well be the only cooking appliance you need in your bar! Otherwise be sure to specify energy efficient small form factor appliances such as rapid cook ovens, microwaves, and toaster ovens.

rational

Rational chefs demonstrate the cooking versatility of their combination ovens with short ribs, bacon-wrapped scallops, and many other treats for Raising the Bar guests on October 11th, 2016.

From the bar operator perspective, the dining trends of full service restaurants also apply to bar service. Specifically, sustainability remains of value to customers, even though the topic hasn’t seen much attention in the bar industry as opposed to the dining world. Mixologist James P. Gatts from Oakland’s Shakewell and Main Squeeze set out to change that through mixing organic beverages by sourcing sustainable cocktail ingredients and artisan small-batch spirits. Organic sourcing (though not necessarily local/seasonal) does often cost more, however, James has been able to offset that added cost through careful planning and use of higher priced liquor. He also noted that the organic sourcing endeavor could be overwhelming at first, but is worthwhile because it gives customers a “sense of time and place”—that is, a connection with your food and your establishment.

Once the presentations concluded, guests enjoyed a vendor fair with plenty of pub grub like flatbreads, gourmet charcuterie, and white anchovy crostinis with accompanying craft beverages. Guests networked with equipment reps and FSTC staff alike to ask specific questions regarding bar service and energy management. As a final note, remember that food prep is the biggest energy using component of the kitchen. So when purchasing new equipment or making changes in your facility/operation, be sure to consult fishnick.com for more tools, tips, and rebate information!

What’s Up 2016?

2016 Forecast

The FSTC’s Richard Young and Robin Ashton, publisher of Foodservice Equipment Reports magazine, present the 2016 Foodservice Forecast: Step Into The Future at the FSTC on February 9th, 2016

Every year, I polish up the FSTC crystal ball and create a Forecast seminar that looks at the coming year in terms of food trends, equipment innovations, energy prices, sustainability, and FSTC lab and field research. The seminar program also includes an economic forecast created and delivered by Robin Ashton, publisher of Foodservice Equipment Reports magazine (www.fermag.com). This year the Robin and Richard Forecast Roadshow made stops at the PG&E FSTC as well as the energy centers at SoCal Edison (SCE) in Los Angeles and SDG&E in San Diego. Turnout was good, conversation was lively, and a lot of great information was shared. At the SCE event, Robin and I were introduced by Chef LaLa (www.cheflala.com), an amazing Latina chef, nutritionist, business woman, author, and media star. Was I star struck? You bet!

lala

The FSTC’s Richard Young meets the amazing Chef LaLa

Here are some of the highlights from the 2016 Foodservice Forecast:

Robin offered up good news for the CFS industry: 2016 looks like a great year for business and here’s why: Employment is up and the numbers show the US at near “full employment”. Gasoline is cheap, which has put billions of dollars back into the pockets of the dining public. To top it off, “real income” has inched up just a little bit. This is important because real income has been flat since the meltdown back in 2008. To sum it up: working people with stable jobs and disposable income will go out to eat a lot in 2016. The one potential hitch is that Wall Street has been in panic mode since December 2015 – the bankers could possibly reign in investment and dampen the party a bit. However, as Robin pointed out, Wall Street and Main Street are two different things and if the bankers can keep cool, foodservice will have a banner year.

…Wall Street and Main Street are two different things and if the bankers can keep cool, foodservice will have a banner year…

The Forecast seminar always includes a look at the NRA’s What’s Hot Chef Survey to see how food trends are evolving and how that might impact the world of CFS equipment and energy efficiency. According to the American Culinary Federation (ACF) survey, chefs think the hot trends now and for the coming decade will include “locally grown”, “natural”, and “environmental sustainability”. The subject of “locally grown” spurred much discussion around the elephant in the room – the potential compromise of food safety as demonstrated by Chipotle last year. Food safety is “priority one” in foodservice and Chipotle is going out of their way to make “local” and “safe” fit into the same sentence. Everyone else will need to follow. The Forecast asked the question, “What might happen in the kitchen to ensure safety for all produce?” One suggestion was that we may see more equipment-based solutions like produce washers or increased safety practices like blanching.

…what might happen in the kitchen to ensure safety for all produce? One suggestion was that we may see more equipment-based solutions…

Another major trend that chefs agreed upon was “Chef Driven Fast Casual” which suggests highly focused menus and kitchen equipment packages that will need to be fast, flexible, and efficient. Also, small plates continue to be big business, which means that dishmachines are not going anywhere. The FSTC has been digging in deep on dishmachine energy and water use and some of the findings are surprising. Stay tuned for reports and seminars!

And, of course, food trucks are still red hot as both an entry into the foodservice business and a stepping stone toward brick-and-mortar for more experienced professionals. The California Energy Wise program – a workforce education and training partnership between PG&E, SoCal Edison, SoCal Gas, and SDG&E  foodservice centers – is offering several workshops this year on starting restaurants, food trucks, and small, fast, and flexible equipment. You can find all the dates and locations for these free events at fishnick.com/education/seminars/events.

The California Energy Wise program is offering several workshops this year on starting restaurants, food trucks, and small, fast, and flexible equipment

Animal proteins are giving up more center-of-the-plate space to plants as broiled veggies are gaining popularity, which means that we need more high-efficiency, high-performance broilers. The FSTC will be studying underfired infrared broilers in the field in 2016 to see what the potential savings may be. Preliminary numbers suggest savings in the $1,000/year range.

More plants on the plate also suggest that there might be more steamers in kitchens. In the FSTC lab, we just tested three high-efficiency, high-production steamers – two counter-top units (Vulcan C24E3/5-LWE) and one two-compartment institutional style unit (Cleveland 24CGA6). These boiler-based steamers really deliver on food production and incorporate controls to cut energy and water use. One steamer even has a “set-back” mode that cuts idle energy and water use when the unit is not cooking. You can find hot-off-the-press research reports from November and December 2015 right here: fishnick.com/publications/appliancereports/steamers.

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Energy Management Systems and a View into the Smart Restaurants of the Future

Elan Frantz, Research Engineerelan

Disney’s movie “Smart House,” released in 1999, was based on a fictitious, futuristic house with a mind of its own. Upon a command from the owner, the house could whip up a smoothie, clean instantaneously, and even cook dinner. Everyone who has owned or helped operate a restaurant can dream about a “smart restaurant-” a place which can take some of the responsibility of running a foodservice establishment away. While we don’t have kitchens that run themselves yet, we are coming closer to having intelligent restaurants with the emergence of Energy Management Systems (EMS). With an EMS, operators can view the real-time status of the energy-using systems in their restaurant from their computer or smartphone and even control certain aspects like the temperature of the building or the lighting settings. Luckily for restaurant owners, EMS systems do not typically turn evil and trap you like the house in the Disney movie.

Installing an EMS is like adding a central nervous system to your restaurant. Information like restaurant temperature and light settings are all controllable and viewable through a single system. As the name suggests, the goal of EMS systems is to carefully manage the energy expenditure of a building to reduce the total energy footprint and save money for the operator. Before EMS systems entered the foodservice world, these products were popularized by effectively saving energy by managing the HVAC and lighting systems for office buildings. Simple programs that would turn down the lights and air conditioning systems when the building was unoccupied were successful in significantly reducing energy bills. More recently, EMS vendors have been targeting restaurants because of the large energy saving opportunities of these facilities. Unfortunately, the intricacies of energy management in the restaurant space have made it difficult for EMS to gain widespread popularity. With climbing energy costs and monthly energy bills upward of $5,000 for a single restaurant, energy management is beginning to make a great deal of sense.

We at the FSTC are dreaming about what the EMS of the future will look like. One day, restaurant operators will be able to view and control the energy consumption of nearly all of their energy using systems, from fryers to freezers, from hot plates to HVAC systems. Allowing operators to control these systems will allow energy usage to be optimized in ways never previously realized. These are the areas we hope the EMS of the future to touch on:

– HVAC
– Lighting
– Refrigeration
– Ice Machines
– Demand Control Ventilation
– Kitchen Appliances
– Water Heating

By opening an application, you, the restaurant operator, will be able to see real-time charts and graphs depicting where your energy is being used and how you can save money. You can already do this with many systems on the market today with your HVAC and lighting systems. Ultimately, we hope that all of your energy systems will be under this EMS umbrella, saving the most green possible!

Is there a Twinkie hanging from your ceiling? What your lighting might really be saying about your “sustainable” restaurant.

bio pic 020208b smallerRichard Young, Senior Engineer and Director of Education

People who have seen me speak at conferences, workshops and tradeshows are familiar with my technique of using humor to make a point about energy efficiency. I love nothing better than to poke a little fun at some of the energy-wasteful things that I see in the food service world – not to be bossy or pedantic – just to lighten the mood and perhaps illuminate some of the things that we might all be doing better. With that attitude in mind, I hope you will indulge me as we ponder the question of “the Twinkie hanging from your ceiling”.

But first, a little background: I love good food and I especially love good, locally-grown, freshly prepared food. In fact as I’m writing this I’m enjoying a cup of premium “third-wave” coffee and a vegetarian egg brioche with fresh figs, greens and walnuts on a gluten free bun. (This would be the appropriate time for my burger-and-fries friends to have a chuckle at my expense.) I’m sitting in a beautiful sunlit cafe in Oakland CA and right across the street I can see the super-popular, nationally-famous restaurant that first inspired the idea of these dangling twinkles that I want to talk about.

This restaurant is super-popular for a reason; the food is amazingly good, fresh, local, and creative and the chef/owner is completely dedicated to his craft. I’ve had some of my favorite meals here and it was in this restaurant, while I was having lunch with lighting expert Derry Berrigan, that I was first able to articulate what was bugging me so much about many of my favorite local restaurants and bars. Derry and I were talking about the current practice of using antique-looking Edison style lamps in so many new establishments. These lamps are not our favorites. Besides the fact that the last time these lamps were fashionable was back in the 90’s (that would be the 1890’s) they are incredibly inefficient light sources and they add lots of heat to the space. To a sustainability geek like myself, these are charming little eco-nightmares.

In a flash of insight it suddenly came to me: “Derry” I said, “this chef, who cares so much about food sustainability that he raises his own chickens, would never pull a Twinkie out of the package, throw it on a plate and add it to his desert menu, but his ceiling is filled with these antique space heaters masquerading as lighting. Seeing these lamps in a restaurant that prides itself on sustainability is just as weird as seeing a Twinkie on the menu.”

 twinkie

[Now don’t get me wrong. I love a Twinkie as much as the next guy. They are a much beloved snack food with an amazing shelf life. It’s just that they are not exactly farmer’s market fare.]

“Derry” I continued, “I think that if this chef and all his chef friends knew that these energy guzzlers were driving up their utility bills and wasting natural resources, they would find some alternative and this nostalgia fad would fade away.”

Derry, who is one of the Nation’s top LED experts and a forward thinking lighting designer, had a quick comeback. “Richard, you have to admit that these lamps do add a certain quaint charm to the space, especially in an old brick building like this. What’s your efficient alternative?”

Okay, point well taken. Derry always inspires me to think about the big picture. So here are a couple of thoughts regarding these lamps:

  1. If you really love the look of these lamps, please use them sparingly and think of them as “quaint decorations.” Then, make sure that you are using the most energy-efficient lighting in the rest of your business.
  2. Check out some of the efficient alternatives to these lamps. Manufacturers like Rambus and Plumen make some lamps with really interesting form factors.
  3. Consider using actual fixtures instead of just lamps on a cord. When did we decide as a culture that bare bulbs hanging from the ceiling were “good design”? An LED lamp inside a nice pendant fixture is a better looking alternative and the energy savings will pay for the extra up-front cost of the fixture itself.

The bottom line is this: If you really want to operate a truly green and sustainable restaurant, then you should not be lighting your space with the most inefficient, energy-wasting light bulb on the planet. No Twinkies on the menu – no Twinkies hanging from the ceiling!

FSTC guest educational offerings at PowerSave Green Campus Summit and the PG&E Pacific Energy Center (PEC)

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Hedrick Dining Hall at UCLAFSTC Research Engineer, Kong Sham, teaches students from the student-led statewide energy-efficiency program, PowerSave Green Campus, how to perform a comprehensive energy and water audit at their UCLA campus dining hall. For several years the FSTC has partnered with the Alliance to Save Energy and their PowerSave Green Campus program, to present hands-on and classroom based educational sessions for the students of the program, which currently represent over 100 students at 23 UCs and CSUs across the state. This particular session took place at the 9th Annual 2013 PowerSave Green Campus Energy Efficiency Summit.Kong and students

Learn more about the PowerSave program here.

The Annual Summits give new and experienced PowerSave Green Campus interns the opportunity to attend training sessions on project planning, learn about best practice projects and technologies that have been successful at a number of campuses, and network with professional who have made a career in the energy field.

Kong demonstrating energy & water efficiency fundamentals

Here, Kong is demonstrating some advanced LED technologies for MR-16 applications that would work well in the dining hall serving areas and foodservice retail locations on campus – looking great while reducing electric use of the fixtures significantly. These MR16 LEDs are meant to replace halogen lamps and will save about 75% of the energy consumed per watt.

Kong gives LED lighting demo to students

 

LED 2.0: The Holy Grail Has Arrived

Richard Young, Senior Engineer and Director of Education

This is an exciting week – perhaps even a tipping point in the path to efficient restaurant lighting. Soraa, a lighting company based in Fremont California (http://www.soraa.com/), officially announced their new product, an LED lamp so radical that’s it’s considered a “disruptive technology.” Soraa has created the holy grail of front-of-house lighting: a true LED equivalent to the 50 watt halogen MR16 lamp.

The FSTC staff actually got a sneak preview about a week before the release date but we had to hold our tongues until the actual product announcement. It was a long week! But, now we can tell the story and talk about how this will affect the restaurant world.

The most widely used decorative lamp in food service is the MR16 halogen – the small, bright, 2-inch diameter lamps often used as spots in dining rooms, bars, retail, wine sections…basically everywhere. The favorite flavor is the 50 watt version. For years, the LED industry has eyed the MR16 with envy and tried everything to produce a true solid state equivalent. The closest they could come was a pretty decent 35 watt, but it really didn’t have the attributes, like focus and intensity, of the real halogen MR16.

Soraa has changed all that by creating a new type of ultra-pure gallium nitride crystal that allows the LED package to be smaller and brighter while operating at a higher temperature. This LED is so small that it is considered a “point-source,” like the halogen lamp in an MR16. This is important: a point source can be focused with optics to produce a controlled, intense, beam of light.

Here are three design elements that make the Soraa lamp radical:

  1. Heat sinks are critical to solid state lighting and the Soraa lamp uses an advanced heat sink design that creates a convective air-current to move the heat away from the electronics.
  2. The electronics are designed to operate at a higher ambient temperature so the lumen (light) output of the lamp will not diminish in normal applications.  This is important because Soraa is driving 12 watts through a single LED chip!
  3. White LEDs have a strong blue component that has to be overcome with optics in order to get a decent warm white. The Soraa lamp is based on a violet LED and it doesn’t have the “blue spike” so, color control is more effective and efficient – producing excellent color rendering and stability.

Did I mention that they look great?

Then there is the price which is expected to be in the mid-twenty dollar range. A quick calc shows about a one year payback for a lamp that is on about 10 hours a day – not counting the labor/maintenance savings you get from a 25,000 hour lamp.

By the way, you can do your own easy lighting calculations using the new FSTC Online Lighting Calculator at http://www.fishnick.com/saveenergy/tools/calculators/silampcalc.php .

The buzz around the FSTC lab has been electric. We can all think of dozens of applications for these lamps and are dying to get our hands on some to try out. Keep an eye on this blog for upcoming examples of real world installs.